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Jeremiah 25:18

Albert Barnes
Notes on the Whole Bible

As it is this day - Words omitted by the Septuagint, and probably added by Jeremiah after the murder of Gedaliah had completed the ruin of the land.

Matthew Henry
Concise Bible Commentary
The evil and the good events of life are often represented in Scripture as cups. Under this figure is represented the desolation then coming upon that part of the world, of which Nebuchadnezzar, who had just began to reign and act, was to be the instrument; but this destroying sword would come from the hand of God. The desolations the sword should make in all these kingdoms, are represented by the consequences of excessive drinking. This may make us loathe the sin of drunkenness, that the consequences of it are used to set forth such a woful condition. Drunkenness deprives men of the use of their reason, makes men as mad. It takes from them the valuable blessing, health; and is a sin which is its own punishment. This may also make us dread the judgments of war. It soon fills a nation with confusion. They will refuse to take the cup at thy hand. They will not believe Jeremiah; but he must tell them it is the word of the Lord of hosts, and it is in vain for them to struggle against Almighty power. And if God's judgments begin with backsliding professors, let not the wicked expect to escape.
Ellen G. White
Prophets and Kings, 431

Although the sentence of doom had been clearly pronounced, its awful import could scarcely be understood by the multitudes who heard. That deeper impressions might be made, the Lord sought to illustrate the meaning of the words spoken. He bade Jeremiah liken the fate of the nation to the draining of a cup filled with the wine of divine wrath. Among the first to drink of this cup of woe was to be “Jerusalem, and the cities of Judah, and the kings thereof.” Others were to partake of the same cup—“Pharaoh king of Egypt, and his servants, and his princes, and all his people,” and many other nations of earth—until God's purpose should have been fulfilled. See Jeremiah 25. PK 431.1

To illustrate further the nature of the swift-coming judgments, the prophet was bidden to “take of the ancients of the people, and of the ancients of the priests; and go forth unto the valley of the son of Hinnom,” and there, after reviewing the apostasy of Judah, he was to dash to pieces “a potter's earthen bottle,” and declare in behalf of Jehovah, whose servant he was, “Even so will I break this people and this city, as one breaketh a potter's vessel, that cannot be made whole again.” PK 431.2

The prophet did as he was commanded. Then, returning to the city, he stood in the court of the temple and declared in the hearing of all the people, “Thus saith the Lord of hosts, the God of Israel; Behold, I will bring upon this city and upon all her towns all the evil that I have pronounced against it, because they have hardened their necks, that they might not hear My words.” See Jeremiah 19. PK 431.3

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