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John 5:22

Adam Clarke
Bible Commentary

The Father judgeth no man - This confirms what he had said before, John 5:17, John 5:19, that the Father acts not without the Son, nor the Son without the Father; their acts are common, their power equal.

Albert Barnes
Notes on the Whole Bible

Judgeth no man - Jesus in these verses is showing his “equality with God.” He affirmed John 5:17 that he had the same power over the Sabbath that his Father had; in John 5:19, that he did the same things as the Father; in John 5:21 particularly that he had the same power to raise the dead. He now adds that God has given him the authority to “judge” men. The Father pronounces judgment on no one. This office he has committed to the Son. The power of judging the world implies ability to search the heart, and omniscience to understand the motives of all actions. This is a work which none but a divine being can do, and it shows, therefore, that the Son is equal to the Father.

Hath committed … - Hath appointed him to be the judge of the world. In the previous verse he had said that he had power “to raise the dead;” he here adds that it will be his, also, to “judge” them when they are raised. See Acts 17:31.

Matthew Henry
Concise Bible Commentary
The Divine power of the miracle proved Jesus to be the Son of God, and he declared that he worked with, and like unto his Father, as he saw good. These ancient enemies of Christ understood him, and became more violent, charging him not only with sabbath-breaking, but blasphemy, in calling God his own Father, and making himself equal with God. But all things now, and at the final judgment, are committed to the Son, purposely that all men might honour the Son, as they honour the Father; and every one who does not thus honour the Son, whatever he may think or pretend, does not honour the Father who sent him.
Ellen G. White
Thoughts From the Mount of Blessing, 125

Even the sentence, “Thou that judgest doest the same things,” does not reach the magnitude of his sin who presumes to criticize and condemn his brother. Jesus said, “Why beholdest thou the mote that is in thy brother's eye, but considerest not the beam that is in thine own eye?” MB 125.1

His words describe one who is swift to discern a defect in others. When he thinks he has detected a flaw in the character or the life he is exceedingly zealous in trying to point it out; but Jesus declares that the very trait of character developed in doing this un-Christlike work, is, in comparison with the fault criticized, as a beam in proportion to a mote. It is one's own lack of the spirit of forbearance and love that leads him to make a world of an atom. Those who have never experienced the contrition of an entire surrender to Christ do not in their life make manifest the softening influence of the Saviour's love. They misrepresent the gentle, courteous spirit of the gospel and wound precious souls, for whom Christ died. According to the figure that our Saviour uses, he who indulges a censorious spirit is guilty of greater sin than is the one he accuses, for he not only commits the same sin, but adds to it conceit and censoriousness. MB 125.2

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Ellen G. White
SDA Bible Commentary, vol. 5 (EGW), 1134

14. No Thirst for the World—“Whosoever drinketh of the water that I shall give him shall never thirst”—never crave the world's advantages and attractions—“but the water that I shall give him shall be in him a well of water springing up unto everlasting life” (Letter 5, 1900). 5BC 1134.1

A Channel—You must seek to have an indwelling Saviour, who will be to you as a well of water, springing up into everlasting life. The water of life flowing from the heart always waters the hearts of others (Manuscript 69, 1912). 5BC 1134.2

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Ellen G. White
My Life Today, 335

I Too May Conquer

By thy words thou shalt be justified, and by thy words thou shalt be condemned. Matthew 12:37 ML 335.1

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Ellen G. White
Reflecting Christ, 20.2

Sin-burdened, struggling souls, Jesus in His glorified humanity has ascended into the heavens to make intercession for us. “For we have not an high priest which cannot be touched with the feeling of our infirmities; but was in all points tempted like as we are, yet without sin. Let us therefore come boldly unto the throne of grace.” We should be continually looking unto Jesus, the author and finisher of our faith; for by beholding Him we shall be changed into His image, our character will be made like His. We should rejoice that all judgment is given to the Son, because in His humanity He has become acquainted with all the difficulties that beset humanity. RC 20.2

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