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John 7:37

Adam Clarke
Bible Commentary

In the last day, that great day of the feast - This was the eighth day, and was called the great day, because of certain traditional observances, and not on account of any excellence which it derived from the original institution. On the seven days they professed to offer sacrifices for the seventy nations of the earth, but on the eighth day they offered sacrifices for Israel; therefore the eighth day was more highly esteemed than any of the others. It is probably to this that the evangelist refers when he calls the last day the great day of the feast. See the account of the feast of tabernacles, in the note on John 7:2; (note). It was probably when they went to draw water from the pool Siloam, and while they were pouring it out at the foot of the altar, that our Lord spoke these words; for, as that ceremony pointed out the gracious influences of the Holy Spirit, our Lord, who was the fountain whence it was to proceed, called the people to himself, that, by believing on him, they might be made partakers of that inestimable benefit.

Matthew Henry
Concise Bible Commentary
On the last day of the feast of tabernacles, the Jews drew water and poured it out before the Lord. It is supposed that Christ alluded to this. If any man desires to be truly and for ever happy, let him apply to Christ, and be ruled by him. This thirst means strong desires after spiritual blessings, which nothing else can satisfy; so the sanctifying and comforting influences of the Holy Spirit, were intended by the waters which Jesus called on them to come to Him and drink. The comfort flows plentifully and constantly as a river; strong as a stream to bear down the opposition of doubts and fears. There is a fulness in Christ, of grace for grace. The Spirit dwelling and working in believers, is as a fountain of living, running water, out of which plentiful streams flow, cooling and cleansing as water. The miraculous gifts of the Holy Spirit we do not expect, but for his more common and more valuable influences we may apply. These streams have flowed from our glorified Redeemer, down to this age, and to the remote corners of the earth. May we be anxious to make them known to others.
Ellen G. White
The Voice in Speech and Song, 91.2

Invitations Full of Compassion—There was marked authority in His requirements and promises, and His invitations were full of compassion and entreaty. How tenderly He said to the toiling people, “Come unto Me, all ye that labor and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest.” ... With what power and compassion Jesus cried, “If any man thirst, let him come unto Me, and drink.”—The Review and Herald, February 21, 1893. VSS 91.2

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Ellen G. White
The Upward Look, 307.4

Jesus proclaimed on the last great day of the feast, “If any man thirst, let him come unto me, and drink” (chap. 7:37); and again we hear Him saying, “Come unto me, all ye that labour and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest. Take my yoke upon you, and learn of me; for I am meek and lowly in heart: and ye shall find rest unto your souls. For my yoke is easy, and my burden is light” (Matthew 11:28-30). Have you tried it? There are many who have, and they know that the words of Christ are verity and truth, and that when trouble has come in like a flood, they have looked to Jesus and have been comforted and strengthened. UL 307.4

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Ellen G. White
The Upward Look, 144.4

We have only to come, complying with the invitation, “If any man thirst, let him come unto me, and drink” (John 7:37). “Him that cometh to me I will no wise cast out” (chap. 6:37). Every human being, as he reads these words, should feel that he is on holy ground. Remember that the life of the only begotten Son of God was offered up for you. As the Holy Spirit impresses Christ's words on the heart and mind, man must feel that he is in the presence of superior goodness, superseding immeasurably anything that earth can afford. He must feel that he is occupying holy ground, for he is close to the living fountain of mercy and love. UL 144.4

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Ellen G. White
That I May Know Him, 105

In the last day, that great day of the feast, Jesus stood and cried, saying, If any man thirst, let him come unto me, and drink. John 7:37. TMK 105.1

Once a year, at the Feast of Tabernacles, the children of Israel called to mind the time when their fathers dwelt in tents in the wilderness, as they journeyed from Egypt to the land of Canaan. The services of the last day of this feast were of peculiar solemnity, but the greatest interest centered in the ceremony that commemorated the bringing of water from the rock. When in a golden vessel the waters of Siloam were borne by the priests into the temple, and, after being mingled with wine, were poured over the sacrifice on the altar, there was great rejoicing.... On this occasion, above all the confusion of the crowd and the sounds of rejoicing, a voice is heard: “If any man thirst, let him come unto me, and drink.” The attention of the people is arrested. Outwardly all is joy, but the eye of Jesus, beholding the throng with the tenderest compassion, sees the soul parched and thirsting for the waters of life.... TMK 105.2

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Ellen G. White
That I May Know Him, 7.3

Christ has said: “If any man thirst, let him come unto me, and drink” (John 7:37). Have you exhausted the fountain? No, for it is inexhaustible. Just as soon as you feel your need, you may drink, and drink again. The fountain is always full. And when you have once drunk of that fountain you will not be seeking to quench your thirst from the broken cisterns of this world; you will not be studying how you can find the most pleasure, amusement, fun, and frolic. No, because you have been drinking from the stream which makes glad the city of God. Then your joy will be full, for Christ will be in you.1 TMK 7.3

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