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Deuteronomy 34:4

Albert Barnes
Notes on the Whole Bible

I have caused thee to see it - The sight thus afforded to Moses, like that of “all the kingdoms of the world in a moment of time” Luke 4:5, was no doubt supernatural.

Matthew Henry
Concise Bible Commentary
Moses seemed unwilling to leave his work; but that being finished, he manifested no unwillingness to die. God had declared that he should not enter Canaan. But the Lord also promised that Moses should have a view of it, and showed him all that good land. Such a sight believers now have, through grace, of the bliss and glory of their future state. Sometimes God reserves the brightest discoveries of his grace to his people to support their dying moments. Those may leave this world with cheerfulness, who die in the faith of Christ, and in the hope of heaven.
Ellen G. White
Spiritual Gifts, vol. 4a, 39

Here Moses sinned. He became wearied with the continual murmurings of the people against him, and at the commandment of the Lord took the rod, and, instead of speaking to the rock, as God commanded him, he smote it with the rod twice, after saying, “Must we fetch you water out of this rock.” He here spoke unadvisedly with his lips. He did not say, God will now show you another evidence of his power, and bring you water out of this rock. He did not ascribe the power and glory to God for causing water to again flow from the flinty rock, and therefore did not magnify him before the people. For this failure on the part of Moses, God would not permit him to lead the people to the promised land. 4aSG 39.1

The sins of good men, whose general deportment has been worthy of imitation, are peculiarly offensive to God. They cause Satan to triumph, and to taunt the angels of God with the failings of God's chosen instruments, and give the unrighteous occasion to lift themselves up against God. The Lord had himself led Moses in a special manner, and had revealed to him his glory, as to no other upon the earth. He was naturally impatient, but had taken hold firmly of the grace of God, and so humbly implored wisdom from Heaven, that he was strengthened from God, and had overcome his impatience so that he was called of God the meekest man upon the face of the whole earth. 4aSG 39.2

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Ellen G. White
Early Writings, 163-4

When Israel murmured against God and against Moses because they could get no water, they accused him of leading them out to kill them and their children. God heard their murmurings and bade Moses speak to the rock, that the people might have water. Moses smote the rock in wrath and took the glory to himself. The continual waywardness and murmuring of the children of Israel had caused him the keenest sorrow, and for a little time he forgot how much the Lord had borne with them, and that their murmuring was not against him, but against God. He thought only of himself, how deeply he was wronged, and how little gratitude they manifested in return for his deep love for them. EW 163.1

It was God's plan to bring often His people into strait places, and then in their necessity to deliver them by His power, that they might realize His love and care for them, and thus be led to serve and honor Him. But Moses had failed to honor God and magnify His name before the people that they might glorify Him. In this he brought upon himself the Lord's displeasure. EW 163.2

When Moses came down from the mount with the two tables of stone and saw Israel worshiping the golden calf, his anger was greatly kindled, and he threw down the tables of stone and broke them. I saw that Moses did not sin in this. He was wroth for God, jealous for His glory. But when he yielded to the natural feelings of his heart and took to himself the honor which was due to God, he sinned, and for that sin God would not suffer him to enter the land of Canaan. EW 163.3

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Ellen G. White
Testimonies for the Church, vol. 1, 659

“Just before going into the meeting, I had a revival of some interesting scenes which had passed before me in vision, and I spoke to Brethren Andrews, Rodman, Howard, Mead, and several others who were present. It seemed to me that the angels were making a rift in the cloud and letting in the beams of light from heaven. The subject that was presented so strikingly was the case of Moses. I exclaimed: ‘Oh, that I had the skill of an artist, that I might picture the scene of Moses upon the mount!’ His strength was firm. ‘Unabated,’ is the language of the Scripture. His eye was not dimmed through age, yet he was upon that mount to die. The angels buried him, but the Son of God soon came down and raised him from the dead and took him to heaven. But God first gave him a view of the land of promise, with His blessing upon it. It was as it were a second Eden. As a panorama this passed before his vision. He was shown the appearing of Christ at His first advent, His rejection by the Jewish nation, and His death upon the cross. Moses then saw Christ's second advent and the resurrection of the just. I also spoke of the meeting of the two Adams—Adam the first, and Christ the second Adam—when Eden shall bloom on earth again. The particulars of these interesting points I design to write out for Testimony No. 14. The brethren wished me to repeat the same in the evening meeting. 1T 659.1

“Our meeting through the day had been most solemn. I had such a burden upon me Sunday evening that I wept aloud for about half an hour. Monday, solemn appeals had been made, and the Lord was sending them home. I went into meeting Tuesday evening a little lighter. I spoke an hour with great freedom upon subjects I had seen in vision, which I have referred to. Our meeting was very free. Brother Howard wept like a child, as did also Brother Rodman. Brother Andrews talked in an earnest, touching manner, and with weeping. Brother Ball arose and said that there seemed to be two spirits about him that evening, one saying to him: Can you doubt that this testimony from Sister White is of heaven? Another spirit would present before his mind the objections he had opened before the enemies of our faith. ‘Oh, if I could feel satisfied,’ said he, ‘in regard to all these objections, if they could be removed, I would feel that I had done Sister White a great injury. I have recently sent a piece to the Hope of Israel. If I had that piece, what would I not give!’ He felt deeply, and wept much. The Spirit of the Lord was in the meeting. Angels of God seemed drawing very near, driving back the evil angels. Minister and people wept like children. We felt that we had gained ground, and that the powers of darkness had given back. Our meeting closed well. 1T 659.2

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Ellen G. White
The Story of Redemption, 172-3

Moses closed his last instructions to the people by a most powerful, prophetic address. It was pathetic and eloquent. By inspiration of God he blessed separately the tribes of Israel. In his closing words he dwelt largely upon the majesty of God and the excellency of Israel, which would ever continue if they would obey God and take hold of His strength. SR 172.1

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Ellen G. White
Spiritual Gifts, vol. 4a, 56-7

Joshua was selected of God to be Moses’ successor in leading the Hebrew host to the promised land. He was most solemnly consecrated to the future important work of leading, as a faithful shepherd, the people of Israel. “And Joshua, the son of Nun, was full of the spirit of wisdom; for Moses had laid his hands upon him. And the children of Israel hearkened unto him, and did as the Lord commanded Moses.” And he gave Joshua charge before all the congregation of Israel, “Be strong and of a good courage; for thou shalt bring the children of Israel unto the land which I sware unto them, and I will be with thee.” He spoke to Joshua in God's stead. He also had the elders and officers of the tribes gathered before him, and he solemnly charged them to deal justly and righteously in their religious offices, and to faithfully obey all the instructions he had given them from God. He called heaven and earth to record against them, that if they should depart from God, and transgress his commandments, he was clear, for he had faithfully instructed and warned them. 4aSG 56.1

“And Moses went up from the plains of Moab unto the mountain of Nebo, to the top of Pisgah, that is over against Jericho, and the Lord shewed him all the land to Gilead, unto Dan. And all Naphtali, and the land of Ephraim, and Manasseh, and all the land of Judah, unto the utmost sea, and the south, and the plain of the valley of Jericho, the city of palm trees, unto Zoar. And the Lord said unto him, This is the land which I sware unto Abraham, unto Isaac, and unto Jacob, saying, I will give it unto thy seed. I have caused thee to see it with thine eyes, but thou shalt not go over thither. So Moses, the servant of the Lord, died there in the land of Moab, according to the word of the Lord. And he buried him in a valley, in the land of Moab, over against Beth-peor; but no man knoweth of his sepulchre unto this day. And Moses was a hundred and twenty years old when he died; his eye was not dim, nor his natural force abated.” 4aSG 56.2

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